Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

multiple ethnic groups seeking a discrete cultural--and legal--identity. The outstanding illustration of the corporate model is to be found in the political arrangements between Quebec and Canada.

Both models assume a central state government as well as an essentially stratified economic system. The liberal model is based on the acceptance of the existing stratification system. It views society as a meritocracy and does not question its economic system, although it requires equal opportunity and permits the state to intervene so that no group is totally oppressed. It is the role of the state managers to see that all group conflicts, whether class or ethnically based, are managed so as to maintain the order of the society. The corporate model adds a unique dimension. Economic and political equality are viewed as also being group characteristics. The role of the state is to assist each group in achieving parity. Theoretically, then, if the distribution of privilege, wealth, and power is the same in the minority society as it is in the majority society, then corporate pluralism has been achieved. The fact that both societies could have large numbers of poor people and great differences between the wealthy and the rest of the population is considered irrelevant to these models.

Beyond these models, economic and cultural differentials are generating considerable conflict. There is a general perception that immigrants are taking the jobs of native workers as well as competing for existing public and social services in the community. Consequently, the majority of Americans want to halt immigration, and they want also to declare English as the "official language."

Peter Brimelow, in the excerpt from his book, writes that an "ethnic and racial transformation" is taking place. As a consequence, American core values are seen as being threatened by the high immigration of so many diverse cultural groups. Brimelow views the new immigrant stream as less skilled than earlier streams, offering unneeded, unskilled labor power, providing no economic benefit to the society, while using health, education, and welfare services at the expense of the citizen taxpayers. For Brimelow, the United States has always "had a specific ethnic core. And that core has been white."

David Cole, in contrast, views Brimelow's position as the "New Know Nothingism" and presents a response to what he labels the five myths of immigration. Cole argues that the new immigrants, like their predecessors, are assimilating and that they pay more in taxes than they cost in benefits received.

Geoffrey Nunberg, in his essay "Lingo Gringo," focuses exclusively on the issue of learning the language. As the fulcrum of assimilation, language learning is critical. Nunberg reports that the majority of immigrant parents, in fact, want their children to learn English. Further, the writer refers to surveys of language usage indicating that perhaps as many as 97 percent are proficient in English. "English- only," he writes," is an irrelevant provocation. It is a bad cure for an imaginary disease."


REFERENCES

Portes, Alejandro, and Ruben Rumbaut ( 1990) Immigrant America: A Portrait. Berkeley: University of California Press.

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.