Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

black people is the best way to go remains to be addressed. Clearly, the divergent tactics show the potential of difficulty of different races working together on these issues, which may or may not be a desired goal.

It is evident that white antiracists are aware of their power and privilege as whites, and in this respect they think about race in a race-cognizant manner. However, they also point out factors that mediate the power of being white, such as gender and class, and also see an advantage in de-emphasizing privilege so that whites will realize they too have something to gain by ending racism. In addition, it seems that whites who are members of antiracist organizations are deeply affected by organizational culture in terms of how they think about race. Institute members were closer to the idealized type of "race cognizance" than were ARA members, who also saw the world in some "colorblind" ways even as they recognized white privilege. These differing outlooks on race had directly to do with the goals of the organizations and the ways in which those groups viewed how to go about reaching people. Further, ARA members saw fighting other "isms" along with racism as not only compatible goals but necessary goals, whereas Institute members interpreted this plurality of goals as "escapism" from racism and yet another dimension of white privilege. The data clearly point to a diversity of white antiracist "coming out" experiences, tactics, and philosophies. I look forward to assessing this diversity and making recommendations as my research continues.


REFERENCES

Aptheker, Herbert. 1992. Antiracism in U.S. History: The First Two Hundred Years. New York: Greenwood Press.

Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo, Tyrone A. Forman, and Jose Padin. 1997. "I Am Not a Racist but . . .': The Contemporary Contours of White Racial Ideology." Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, Ontario.

Carmines, Edward G., and Richard A. Champagne, Jr. 1990. "The Changing Content of American Racial Attitudes: A Fifty Year Portrait." Research in Micropolitics 3:187-208.

Carr, Leslie. 1997. Colorblind Racism. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Eichstedt, Jennifer L. 1997. "White Identities and Anti-Racism Activism." Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, Ontario.

Emerson, Michael O., and David H. Sikkink. 1997. "What People Say, What People Do: Education, Racial Attitudes, and Racial Realities." Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, Toronto, Ontario.

Feagin, Joe R., and Melvin P. Sikes. 1994. Living with Racism: The Black Middle-Class Experience. Boston: Beacon Press.

Feagin, Joe R., and Hernan Vera. 1995. White Racism: The Basics. New York: Routledge.

Frankenberg, Ruth. 1993. White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Gubrium, Jaber E, and James A. Holstein. 1997. The New Language of Qualitative Method. New York: Oxford University Press.

Holstein, James A., and Jaber E Gubrium. 1995. The Active Interview. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

hooks, bell. 1995. Killing Rage: Ending Racism. New York: Henry Holt.

Ignatiev, Noel, and John Garvey. 1996. Race Traitor. New York: Routledge.

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