Documents of American Prejudice: An Anthology of Writings on Race from Thomas Jefferson to David Duke

By S. T. Joshi | Go to book overview

56
Letter to
Sam H. Reading

BY SENATOR J. THOMAS HEFLIN

James Thomas Heflin ( 1869-1951) was a longtime U.S. representative ( 1905-20) and senator ( 1920-31) from Alabama. A white supremacist who was supported by the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s while delivering anti- Catholic speeches throughout the country, Heflin joined with Klansmen and fundamentalist Protestants in a futile attempt to oppose the nomination of Alfred E. Smith as the Democratic candidate for president in 1928. In a letter written to a journalist, Sam H. Reading, on October 15, 1929, and read in the Senate on February 7, 1930, Heflin expresses violent opposition to the prospect of intermarriage between whites and African Americans.

MY DEAR SIR: In reply to your request I will say that I have read with a feeling of sadness and indignation the newspaper account of the humiliated and grief-stricken white father and mother in New York City who could get no assistance from either Governor Roosevelt or Mayor Walker or anyone else in authority in their effort to prevent the marriage of their daughter to a negro. The press reports tell us that the white father and mother wept freely when interviewed by the newspaper men and made no attempt to hide their tears and humiliation when New York officials issued a marriage license to a negro to marry their daughter. And this terrible thing has happened here in what we used to call the land of Anglo-Saxon rule and white supremacy. Shame on those in authority who will permit such a humiliating, disgraceful, and dangerous thing to happen in the United States. Where are the white men of self-respect, of

-331-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents of American Prejudice: An Anthology of Writings on Race from Thomas Jefferson to David Duke
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 600

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.