Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of An American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7. ADVENTURE WITH VIOLENCE

DAY by day the Count and I became better acquainted. We went everywhere together. In the course of two seasons we became familiar with the ideas of Gunsaulus, Arthur Morrow Lewis, Emma Goldman, Professor Hoxie, and the group around William Vaughn Moody at the "Cliff Dwellers." We made the acquaintance of the rough-and-ready free-lance orators at "Bughouse Square" near the Newberry Library on the Near North Side. On the whole, it was an unforgettable experience for me.

One day the Count took me over to 56 Fifth Avenue to meet Charles H. Kerr, translator of the "Internationale" and publisher of the International Socialist Review. He was very friendly, a quiet, studious gentleman with sensitive features, small Vandyke beard, and the forehead of a philosopher. His father was then professor emeritus of Greek literature at the University of Wisconsin. Charles Kerr took an interest in me from the start. He guided me in my studies of socialism, science, and history. He also gave me my first coaching in public speaking. John P. Altgeld's Art of Oratory was used as the textbook. I became a stock‐ holder in the Co-operative Publishing Company by purchasing a ten-dollar share. As time went on, I became more and more closely bound up with that company. A few years later, on my twenty‐ first birthday, I replaced Seymour Stedman on the board of directors, an event which was heralded as a victory for the "red" faction in the Socialist party.

The Count had a way about him. The first time I took him home with me he won the hearts of everyone, including my father. My mother had cooked one of her "special" Sunday dinners. The Count's infectious enthusiasm and rare sense of humor made the general conversation sparkle. Dad was somewhat stunned by the deluge of what he called "highfalutin'" words

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of An American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.