Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of An American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9. NORSE MYTHOLOGY AND
WEDDING RINGS

THE green strip of parkway on Garfield Boulevard was patterned with tree shadows and fragrant with newly cut grass. It seemed pleasant for a change just being one of the crowd. My problem was a choice between the harvest fields again or a job at the easel. I looked at my hands; they were in no condition to do precision work with such a delicate instrument as the airbrush. I took the carefully folded want-ad section out of my pocket and read it over again. The Pioneer Portrait Company was only about a block away on Halsted Street.

I got the job, but the pay was less attractive than I had expected. Mr. Hannan, the proprietor, told me to report for work the following morning if I was willing to start from the bottom. My new employer seemed affable enough. He was close-mouthed and had hard eyes. He took me around the comer to the studio, which was in a small store building on Fifty-sixth Street. There I was introduced to the artists whom I didn't already know. Charley Medin was there and his sister Edith, John Blavka, and one or two others. Tucked away in one corner of the studio was my old associate, Angelo St. Verna Krise. His welcome was so effusive that I suspected he had been talking about me. Senese, the studio superintendent, eyed me suspiciously. He was about to revisit his native Italy for a brief vacation.

As I was accustomed to bronzed faces and arms, everyone in the studio seemed pale and colorless to me. Krise looked like a goggle-eyed ghost. Charley Medin looked pale too, but the city pallor seemed to compliment his blue eyes and his blond hair and mustache. Somehow I couldn't imagine his sister being sunburned like I was. I had never noticed her complexion before. It was, I thought, as delicate as a white peony petal. That was the

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of An American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.