British Budgets 1887-88 to 1912-13

By Bernard Mallet | Go to book overview

trained by Mr. Gladstone to have added that the prestige of the Treasury, as a critic of expenditure, depends in no small degree on the predilections and personality of the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

The year did not pass without the necessity for some supplementary estimates, but the funds raised by the new issue of Consols were sufficient to tide over the additional requirements. These consisted of a further £5,000,000 for the Army, £200,000 for the Navy, and £7,431,000 for the Civil Service and Revenue Departments, this last item being chiefly composed of £6,500,000 for the civil administration which was being set up in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. There also figured in these estimates a grant of £100,000 to Lord Roberts, who had now returned from the seat of war to take up the duties of Commander-in-Chief at the War Office, leaving Lord Kitchener to carry out the final stages of the campaign in South Africa.


SIR MICHAEL HICKS-BEACH'S SEVENTH (AND LAST) BUDGET, 1902-3.

April 14, 1902.

THE year 1902 proved to be the last in which it was necessary to budget on a war basis, and, indeed, so much did affairs in South Africa seem to point to a cessation of hostilities in the early spring that it was a question whether the budget statement should not be held over pending the result of the communications which were known to be passing between the Boer generals and the British Government. There

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