The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
CREEDS AND MEN OF 1828

Resolved, that the Constitution of the United States ought to be amended as to vest the election of President and Vice President directly in the people, preserving the relative weight of the States.

-- ARGUS, Sept. 23, 1829.

To the victors belong the spoils.-- MARCY.


1

A LITTLE assembly of local citizens met in Frankfort in May, 1827, and gave expression to its political views in the declaration that "we will oppose, by all honorable means in our power, the re-election of John Quincy Adams to the Presidency of the United States." A special committee was appointed to coöperate with Jackson committees in Kentucky, Ohio, and other states. Blair was a member of that committee. Those men of frontier democracy advocated direct election of the President by the people and adopted a slogan of "Jackson and Reform."1

Blair forced the Argus to take its stand for Jackson, but it was not rabidly Jacksonian until it had defended Jackson in the Hall Court Case2 and Kendall had assumed the responsibility for the conduct of the paper and had begun his attack on Clay in the fall of 1827. He claimed that he did not, in the beginning, believe Clay to be guilty of a corrupt agreement.3 But when Jackson gave the name of James Buchanan of Pennsylvania as the man who had approached him in Clay's behalf in 1824, the Argus held that one of two things was very evident: either there were foul doings in the election, or Mr. Buchanan had foully slandered the friends of Mr. Clay. The editors of the Argus then began a campaign of bitter attacks on Clay and Adams, which was not to stop until they were established at Washington where they continued their

____________________
1
Argus, May 23, 1827.
3
Argus, July 2, 1828.

-45-

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