The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
SETTING DOWN IN WASHINGTON

Where can one be happier than in the bosom of his family. --PROVERB.

BLAIR arrived in Washington in 1830, accompanied by his family and Mrs. Gratz. He left his plantation and a few slaves in the care of a tenant under the general oversight of Gratz.1 It is quite easily understood why the Blair family went with Blair to Washington. Blair was particularly fond of his wife and children and spent an unusual amount of his time in the companionship of his capable and lovable helpmate, who kept an ever-watchful eye on his health. Mrs. Blair's constant care for his physical welfare aided him in the development of a strong constitution, helping overcome a tubercular tendency, and giving him an eighty-five year lease on life. This courageous daughter of Nathaniel Gist did not propose to be left behind to live on a farm in Kentucky while her husband sallied forth to defend Jackson. She was quiet, unassuming, intelligent, determined, and possessed the qualities which made her equal to facing hardships without a qualm. She was just the wife for a struggling Jacksonian editor.

The father and mother, husband and wife since 1812, left their eldest boy, Montgomery, with Gratz. Blair had greatly admired the Revolutionary hero, General Montgomery, and had sought to perpetuate the General's fame in the name of his son,2 who was born May 10, 1813. By the time the elder Blair left Kentucky, Montgomery was a tall, straight, blue-eyed, fair-complexioned youth of seventeen years of age. He had received the best training obtainable in the schools in Frankfort county and had entered Transylvania University to finish his education. There he hoped

____________________
1
Blair MSS. Benjamin Gratz to Blair, May 31, 1831; Benton, op. cit., 130.
2
Blair MSS., B. Gratz to Blair, May 31, 1831; Major Gist Blair, "Annals of Silver Spring", in Records of the Columbia Historical Society, XXI ( 1918), 155-185.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.