The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
THE FIRST REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CAMPAIGN

Democracy does not reside in the organization of intriguers, but in the mass of the people.--F. P. BLAIR, SR., 1855.


1

THE Congressional and state elections in Missouri in 1854 attracted national interest. The Whig party was in the throes of death, and the new party which was about to come forth to challenge the supremacy of Southern Democracy was in process of being born. The situation in Missouri as it has been described was merely a part of what was happening the country over.

But the troubles of Missouri were centered about Kansas and the embittered contest between the Benton-Blair and the Atchison-Claiborne Jackson wings of the Democracy for the control of the state. The plight of the distracted state was lamented by the anti-slavery press. Greeley of the New York Tribune struck the keynote of freedom's cause when he declared on the question of Kansas:1

We must make a successful stand just here--in resistance to the assumed right of Congress to uphold, recognize, or in any manner legalize slavery in a Territory, and also of the right of the first few thousands of squatters who rush into a new Territory to establish and perpetuate slavery therein, or we shall have no solid ground at all to stand on.

The Blairs fully agreed with Greeley. They did not believe that a lasting internal peace in this country could be attained until the nation was assured that no more slave states were to be admitted to the Union. They were ready to lead a moral crusade against slavery if it insured a free country north of the Mason and

____________________
1
Semi-Weekly Tribune, July 28, Aug. 25, 1854.

-299-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.