The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXV
THE BLAIR PROPOSAL TO PREVENT CIVIL WAR

It is the true mission of a superior and enlightened race to protect and establish with well-founded institutions the feebler races within the reach of its influence. The general welfare requires this, and renders it the exalted duty of powerful nations.

-- F. P. BLAIR, JR., 1859.

THE Blairs believed the nation would be drenched in blood if immediate abolition were attempted. They, with Lincoln, accepted in theory the doctrines of Seward and the abolitionists, only to the extent that the nation must become free through gradual and voluntary emancipation. True to his preaching, Frank began in 1858 to free his slaves. He first freed Henry Dupe and then in 1859 he went before the circuit court in St. Louis to set free Sarah Dupe, wife of Henry, and her three children--"in consideration of faithful services and for divers other good and sufficient reasons moving me thereto. . . . I do hereby grant Courtenay, Caroline, Sallie, and Sarah as perfect freedom as if they had been born free."1 Montgomery had refused to become a heavy slaveholder because slavery was opposed to his avowed principles of liberty. The elder Blair owned or controlled a number of slaves and laborers at Silver Spring, some of whom had drifted onto his estate where they were humanely treated.

To emancipate the negro did not solve the problem of what to do with him afterwards. Wise men were baffled with the question of what should be done with the free negro. A freedman was feared and despised by the masters, neglected by all classes, and subject to the vicissitudes of social inequalities. He was often a lazy, worthless subject given to vagabondage and inclined to tamper with slaves whom he sought to help escape to the North.

____________________
1
Walter B. Stevens, Centennial History of Missouri ( 4 vols., St. Louis, 1921). II, 674.

-443-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.