Scientists and World Order: The Uses of Technical Knowledge in International Organizations

By Ernst B. Haas; Mary Pat Williams | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Work on this book began in the summer of 1973 with a series of exploratory interviews on the Berkeley campus of the University of California, using a sample of scientists and engineers who had worked in or for international organizations. The research design was worked out jointly by Haas and Williams. The bulk of the interviewing was done at the headquarters of various international organizations. It was split evenly between them and carried out during the first half of 1974. Don Babai joined us in the fall of 1975 and assumed major responsibility for chapter 9.

We wish to acknowledge that our work could not have gone forward without the intellectual help of a great many people. Over two hundred scientists and officials gave freely of their time and experience in talking with us in Washington, New York, Geneva, Paris, London, Brussels, Rome, Vienna, and London. The help we received in Berkeley requires special explanation. We enjoyed the advantage of discussions with many of the scientists for which Berkeley is known, though none is in any way responsible for the opinions we express in this book. Moreover, we profited from the stimulation received by participating in the Science Policy Colloquium--a discussion group composed in equal number of natural and social scientists headed by Reinhard Bendix--sponsored by the Institute of International Studies of the University of California, Berkeley.

This book is part of a program funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and housed in the Institute of International Studies of the University of California, Berkeley, known as "Studies on International Scientific and Technological Regimes." Our work could not have gone forward without the stimulation provided by the graduate students, visitors, and fellow faculty members associated with that project. We wish to single out Peter E Cowhey, Branislav Gosovic, Gene Rochlin, and John G. Ruggie as indispensable contributors, though none of them is to be

-ix-

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