Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

International Arbitration, from Athens to Locarno

By Jackson H. Ralston | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
COLLECTIVE AGENCIES WORKING FOR ARBITRATION AND JUDICIAL SETTLEMENT

103. Peace societies in the United States . -- The general subject of which we write has commanded a very considerable support in the United States even from an early period. The first organized movement resulted in the formation of the New York Peace Society in August 1815. This was followed during the same year by similar societies in Ohio, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Georgia, and North Carolina. In 1828 these various organizations were gathered into a national body known as the American Peace Society, which exists to this day and during all these years has regularly published an official organ. For many years it has had as a part of its platform the furtherance, among other things, of commissions of inquiry, councils of conciliation, arbitration of differences, international courts of justice with obligatory jurisdiction, and & enlargement of the obligatory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court of International Justice by the framing of rules of international law.1

In 1895 was organized a voluntary association meeting annually at Lake Mohonk, New York, for the purpose of conferring upon the subject of arbitration. Its conferences were kept up for twenty years and the reports of its proceedings are entitled to large respect, active participants having included many of the most prominent international lawyers of the United States.

In 1907 occurred the first meeting of the American Society of International Law, which had been in process of formation during two preceding years. Its main purpose was and is to further the study of international law, but it has given large attention to all matters of arbitration and judicial settlement of disputes.

In 1910, largely under the efficient leadership of Dr. James Brown Scott, there was organized the American Society for the Judicial Settlement of International Disputes, the prime purpose of which was to secure settlement of disputes through an international judiciary rather

____________________
1
For a full history of this Society and of the development of peace propaganda in the United States and abroad, see The American Peace Society -- A Centennial History, by Edson L. Whitney.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Arbitration, from Athens to Locarno
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.