The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

in the apartment of the parents of Cui's wife. It was a very original apartment, consisting of two or three very small rooms and a huge salle, which made it inexpensive as well as convenient for arranging performances. The opera was studied a long time. Cui and I made the sets ourselves out of some wallpaper that looked Chinese; we obtained costumes and wigs, and in February [22], 1859, the performance took place. The female role was sung by Cui's wife; the mandarin by Musorgsky, he had a good voice;31 the innkeeper by Gumbin, the talented baritone of the Russian opera; the tenor lover by Dr. Chernyavsky and the villain Zai-Sang by Colonel Velyaminov. Instead of an orchestra, the composer Cui played the piano, and he and Balakirev played the overture. There was a large audience, among whom were Dargomizhsky, Vladimir Stasov, and others.-- VICTOR KRYLOV


9. To MILI BALAKIREV, St. Petersburg

[Glebovo] 12 May [Postmarked: 18 June, 1859 St. Petersburg]

DEAR MILI,

The letter has started, so you only need time to read it.--You're familiar with this railway journey; I shall describe for you my trip from the station of Kriukovo, on my way to the Shilovskys.32 At first the country was nothing special, but closer to the New Jerusalem [monastery] it is quite interesting. New Jerusalem occupies a splendid site, from five versts away its oriental, golden bulbs can be seen; it stands on a little hill, vis-à-vis is also a hill (however, a little to the side) where the old town of Voskresensk is; there's a river below, the cathedral is enclosed by a little wood, all around is a wall with little towers looking like those little machines in which you stick pastel crayons (I've forgotten what they're called) topped by weather vanes, the main cupola amazingly resembles un gâteau Mathilde--very amusing inside, they say it's lovely--I'll see.--What a man Patriarch

____________________
31
"Of the five personages the chief role, of the mandarin Kau-Tzing, was played by Musorgsky with such life, gaiety, with such adroitness and comic quality of singing, diction, pause and gesture, that he made the whole company of friends and comrades roar. "--Vladimir Stasov. Preceding this opera, Gogol Lawsuit was given, in which Musorgsky played the role of the civil servant, Proletov.
32
Maria Vasilyevna Shilovskaya had married into Shilovsky's money and luxury after a lurid career as salon singer, during which she dabbled in composing and exercised other less specialized talents which had earned her the distinction of "the most charming woman of her time." She had turned the Shilovsky estate into a rural musical center, inviting a stream of talented composers to rest and work on the estate. Musorgsky was talented, young, and handsome.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.