The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

eastern design); on their heads are black caps (Phrygian) with bands of precious fur.

Setting: The Acropolis dungeon, hewn from the rock. At the left a deep excavation, looking like a cave; to the right and nearer the center, a perspective of winding underground passages. On the forestage, slightly to the audience's left, is a great flat black stone, at the foot of which are scattered dry twigs, heather, leaves and handfuls of straw, forming Mâtho's pallet. Semidarkness.

Mâtho in chains, despondent, exhausted by torture, sits on the black stone, his head bowed; beside him is a coarse, gay mantle . . .13

[Dated] 26 November year 1864. St. Petersburg. Modeste Musorgsky.14

Scene 2: Chorus of priestesses. The priestesses console Salammbô and dress her in bridal robes . . .

[Dated] Peter. 8 February year 1866. M. Musorgsky.

Musorgsky found his first civil service job in the Chief Engineering Department of the Ministry of Communications, beginning work on December 1, 1863, with the rank of Collegiate Secretary.


33. To MILI BALAKIREV

MILI,

A nervous irritation is beginning to work itself up in me rather persistently and forces me to give it my attention.--As I, to prevent any

____________________
13
Subsequent stage directions in this original scene by Musorgsky: "Aminakhar, four priests and four pentarchs enter. The priests hold torches in their hands. They enter slowly, stepping cautiously, occasionally pausing and looking around. Approaching Mâtho, they form a semicircle, holding the torches overhead; the pentarchs, with staffs and red tablets, on which the judgment is inscribed, stand forward . . . During the last words of the priests Mâtho springs up, but then quickly falls back on the stone and, with bowed head, utters in a despairing voice: 'The end!' After the priests are out of sight, Mâtho looks in the direction of their departure, shudders, approaches the dark ravine, then retreats from it with horror . . ."

Flaubert is usually held responsible for the scenic details of Musorgsky Salmbô, but in comparing these with the novel one is forced to suspect that Musorgsky devised them on his own responsibility with some standard work of operatic décot at his elbow.

14
The libretto of this scene is dated: " Petersburg. October, year 1863."

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.