The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

36. To MILI BALAKIREV

27 January [1866]

DEAR MILI,

Sariotti24 feels an irresistible craving for Ludmila's evening on Sunday; if he can be satisfied in this regard, then write me two words-- I hardly know Ludmila's arrangements and I am too slightly acquainted with her,25 to take on to myself the introduction of Sariotti.

Till Sunday.

Yours,
MODESTE MUSORGSKY


37. An Inscription on the Manuscript of "Desire"26

Dedicated to Nadezhda Petrovna Opochinina in memory of her judgment upon me Peter. In the night of the 5th and 16th of April, 1866 (2 o'clock in the morning)


38. To MILI BALAKIREV

Wednesday, 20 April [1866]

DEAR MILI,

Tell me when I may find you at home; we haven't seen each other for so long, and I want very much to chat with you about several matters and to show you a new little piece (a War Song of the Libyans)

____________________
24
Mikhail Ivanovich Sariotti, basso, began his operatic career in Italy but after 1863 he was permanently attached to the company of the Marinsky Theater, where his first new role was that of Holofernes in Serov Judith.
25
Ludmila Ivanovna Shestakova, though thirteen years younger than her brother, Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka, functioned as a superb moral support through. out his peculiar and disturbed career. It was due to her insistence that Glinka wrote his autobiography and collected his scattered songs. After Glinka's death she channeled her enormous energies into preservation of and propaganda for her brother's music and into mothering the circle of intellectuals and young musicians around Balakirev, to whom Glinka had willed his leading position in nationalist music. Musorgsky, though "too slightly acquainted with her" in January 1866, was to become, by January 1867, the favorite of this charming fifty. year-old manager of her late brother's affairs. See Bertensson, "Ludmila Ivanovna Shestakova," in The Musical Quarterly, July 1945.
26
A song on a text by Heine: "Ich wollt'. meine Shmerzen ergössen."

-66-

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