The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

from my Salammbô27--a male chorus based on a theme that you know, with variations à la Georgienne.

I've begun to sketch the witches28--am stuck at the devils--the cortege of Satan doesn't satisfy me yet.

Impatiently waiting to be with you, I press your hand firmly.

MODESTE MUSORGSKY


39. To MILI BALAKIREV, St. Petersburg

Pavlovsk 14th of August 1866

DEAR MILI,

Tell me: will you be at home some morning this week, and on which morning exactly? By the first train I can arrive at your place by about ten o'clock in the morning.--I pledge myself to bring the score of my little Libyan chorus and I thirst to talk with you about the witches. If convenient for you, we could together burst in on Cesar to chew and while away the after-dinner time, which in Europe is known as the avant-soirée.

I haven't seen you for so long and a meeting would be extremely close to my heart.

I firmly press your hand.

MODESTE MUSORGSKY

Address: In Pavlovsk on the Soldatski Slobodka at Popov's dacha.

Salammbô Halted

. . . What compelled Musorgsky to give up such an outwardly interesting subject as Salainmbô? . . . Once I applied to Modeste Petrovich with this question, why had he stopped the work that he had begun? He looked at me intently, then burst out laughing and, with a gesture, said: "It would have been fruitless, what a laughable Carthage would have come of it!" Then he stopped laughing and went on, seriously, "We've had enough of the Orient in Judith. Art isn't a pastime, time is precious." M.P. implied that one can't picture the Orient without having seen it or without knowing its melodies . . . --NIKOLAI KOMPANEISKY

____________________
27
Musorgsky had returned to Salammbô for a short period of additional work on it, before leaving it forever unfinished.
28
Gerald Abraham points out that at its first performance in Russia in March of this year, Liszt Todtentanz, with Anton Rubinstein conducting, was played by Anton Herke, Musorgky's old piano teacher--and that this event may have revived Musorgsky's "witches" of six years before.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.