The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

A MOST HUMBLE PETITION

in which there are the following points:

The first point is also the second, and the last, as well:

Most humbly I appeal to you, Y[our] M[ajesty], not to forget that at various points of the God-preserved city of St. Peter there is a Titular Councilor, and so forth, as set down above, who remembers you and wishes you all success.

[From Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky]

From darling Savishna to thee, my little dove, my darling falcon, brightly wings the warmest greeting. Truly am I gladdened that thine illness, O brother of mine, and the baleful malady have forsaken thee and that thou art again radiant and shining like the fiery sun.--And I feel bitterly offended that Shornik, the naughty one, has stuffed himself with Smetana, and ruins our native music.--Receive, thou sick one, my hearty kiss and nurse no grudge.

Savishna

[From Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov]

I want to tell you something that will please you, this: I was very nearly sent away to Kronstadt for permanent residence there, but I managed to dodge it and now I am sure to be staying on in Peter for good. Vladimir Vasilyevich [Nikolsky], by reason, supposedly, of my emigration to Kronstadt, wrote a poem entitled "A Seven-teared Elegy." Aside from this, I can inform you that I have thought out the theme of the andante (D major) for the symphony,41 and it doesn't seem so bad; this may please you, too, and further, I wish you success.

N. RIMSKY-KORSAKOV


41a. MILI BALAKIREV to MODESTE MUSORGSKY, St. Petersburg

Prague. 11 January, 1867

DEAR MODESTE!

How can you have completely forgotten Ludmila Ivanovna, she writes that you've disappeared. If you want to know about me, go to

____________________
41
Rimsky-Korsakov had returned from America with the squadron in the summer of 1865. His first symphony completed to Balakirev's satisfaction and successfully performed at one of Balakirev's Free School concerts, he was thinking about a second symphony, in B minor--which he soon abandoned.

-73-

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