The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

with theory: (at Borodin's you didn't have a prelude for "Love," but now you do):108 I'll say no more to you on the score of symphonic development.--Now, my dear Korsinka, listen to one thing: creation itself bears within itself its own laws of refinement. Their verification is inner criticism; their application is the artist's instinct. If there is neither one nor the other--there is no creative artist; if there is a creative artist--there must be one as well as the other and the artist is a law unto himself. When the artist revises, he is not content (as in Vengeance--which makes me glad). When he, contented, revises or, what is worse, adds to it, he germanizes, relives what has already been said. We are not ruminants, but omnivorous animals. This would be a contradiction!--and of nature.

"So when you are alone, like this, and you think things over, at leisure, you do come to feel that, after all, one has to . . ."109 become one's self. This is hardest of all, that is, it is the rarest of things to achieve, but it's possible.--And as it's possible, there's no use theorizing, but I kiss Korsinka firmly and even wish him very pleasant dreams, as it is two o'clock at night.

MODESTE

I'll be with you at the end of August.


57. To VLADIMIR NIKOLSKY, St. Petersburg

[Shilovo] 15 August [1868]

Rumors have reached me that my priceless treasure in the dear figure of dyainka, with his characteristic craftiness, has sneaked into my dwelling in my absence.--This treasure of mine had read in the church calendar that June 15 is the day of St. Modestus,110 hence the sneaking in, the treasure wanted to drag me along to a favorably disposed man to enjoy dainties and a heart-to-heart talk.--Thanks to him for this--forsooth! Exceeding thanks, for when a little man feels good he is pleased, and when he gets pleasure from another person then--happy as he is, he says thanks!

____________________
108
Despite Musorgsky's caustic remarks, Rimsky-Korsakov held on to this brief introduction to Antar's fourth movement.
109
"So, when you are alone, like this, and you think things over, at leisure, you do come to feel that, after all, one ought to get married . . ."--the opening lines of Gogol Marriage.
110
Musorgsky's patron saint, St. Modestus, was the tutor of St. Vitus and achieved martyrdom with him.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.