The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

Ludmila Ivanovna that I have given a bit of thinking to her little letter and when we meet (about the 20th of August) I'll have a talk with her. I don't write her because there's nothing to write about, and it's better to talk about this looking into each other's eyes rather than at a distance of 700 versts.--My hearty greetings to Anna Vasilyevna, don't forget your lady, too, for I haven't forgotten her.

MODESTE


57a. ALEXANDER BORODIN to YEKATERINA BORODINA, Moscow

S. Petersburg 25 September [1868]

. . . Afterwards Musorgsky played the first act of Marriage by Gogol, written directly from the text of that writer, without any alteration. It is an extraordinarily curious and paradoxical thing, full of innovations and places of great humor, but as a whole--une chose manquée--impossible in performance. Besides, it bears marks of too hasty labor . . .

Marriage, Act 1

. . . When Musorgsky Marriage was played at our home, A. S. [Dargomizhsky] sang the role of Kochkarov, roaring with laughter till the tears came to his eyes, and enchanted by the wit and expressiveness of this music. In the place where Kochkarov says "these darling little mail-clerks, these sweet little rascals"--A. S. was always obliged to stop, he was so overcome with laughter, and he said to me, "You're playing some sort of symphony there, you're hindering my singing." (in the accompaniment at this point Musorgsky had some amusing curlicues) . . . --NADEZHDA PURGOLD ( RIMSKAYA-KORSAKOVA)

. . . Early in the season [1 868-69] Dargomizhsky's soirées recommenced. The Stone Guest was sung in its entirety. Marriage also roused considerable interest. We were all amazed at Musorgsky's task, enthusiastic about his characterizations and many recitative phrases, but perplexed by some of his chords and harmonic progressions. At this performance Musorgsky himself sang Podkolosin with his inimitable talent; Alex[andra] Nik[olayevna] sang Fyokla; [General] Velyaminov sang Stepan; Nad[ezhda] Nik[olayevna] accompanied, while Dargomizhsky, extremely interested, copied Kochkarov's part in his own hand and sang it with enthusiasm. Everybody particularly enjoyed Fyokla and Kochkarov--the latter expanding on "the darling

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.