The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

up the cross and with lifted head, bravely and happily, I shall go forth, against all sorts of things, towards bright, strong and righteous aims, towards a genuine art that loves man, lives with his joys, his grief and his sufferings. I do not ask for your hand: you long ago extended it and I've long held it firmly, my best, my dear support.

Your

MUSORYANIN

13 July, 1872, in Petrograd


90. To VLADIMIR STASOV

To Vladimir Vasilyevich Stasov, in dedicating Khovanshchina.

To me it doesn't matter and needn't matter that there is no precedent for dedicating such works as do not yet exist. No fear in my heart holds me from this dedication or makes me look back. I want to look forward, not backward. I dedicate to you all that period of my life occupied by the creation of Khovanshchina; there would be nothing funny in my saying: "I dedicate to you both myself and my life for that period," for I still vividly remember: I lived Boris in Boris, and the time I lived in Boris has left precious and indelible marks on my mind. Now the new work, your work, will boil, I already begin to live in it--how many rich impressions, how many new lands to discover, glorious!--So I beg you to accept "all my disorderly being" in the dedication of "Khovanshchina," whose beginning came from you.

MUSORYANIN

15 July, 1872, in Petrograd

[Inscribed on the cover of the enclosed notebook:]

I dedicate to Vladimir Vasilyevich Stasov my work, done to the best of my ability, inspired by his love.

15 July, 1872

MUSORYANIN

KHOVANSHCHINA A people's musical drama in five parts by M. MUSORGSKY

-194-

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