The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

zug ready by the end of November. This is indispensable--or it'll be all up.

Your

MUSORGSKY

22 October '73


113a. ALEXANDER BORODIN to YEKATERINA BORODINA, Moscow [Extract]

[ October 25, 1873]

. . . By the way, here's some news for you-- Boris is to be given in its entirety. Gedeonov, when he returned from abroad to Petersburg, as soon as he got out of his railway-carriage, said in his first words to Lukashevich--"Stage Boris without fail and as quickly as possible; send the score to Ferrero, I will order it passed." Now they're already copying the parts. What is the meaning of this dream? Where does such an unexpected switch come from?--no one knows anything. In any case, the affair is fine. And here is pitiful and sorrowful news--of the author of Boris. He has been drinking heavily. Nearly every day he sits in the Maloyaroslavetz restaurant on Morskaya, often drinking himself Stiff.97 This summer the Sorokins saw him completely drunk in Pavlovsk; he caused a disturbance there; the affair reached the police.98 I have been told that he has already drunk himself to a state of seeing hallucinations and all sorts of trash. Stasova, out of friendship (knowing while she was still abroad about Modeste's adventures) wrote him a letter [No. 105a] about this, in which, casually, she developed the idea that, is it really possible, that all talented Russian musicians must end as Glinka did. This is horribly sad! Such a talented man and sinking so low morally. Now he periodically disappears, then reappears morose, untalkative, which is contrary to his usual habit. After a little while he again comes to himself--sweet, gay, amiable and witty as ever. Devil knows what a pity! . . .

____________________
97
The Maly-Yaroslavetz, so prominent in Musorgsky's more lurid biographies, is not the hell-hole described by Rimsky-Korsakov, but a social center for Petersburg's radical intelligentsia.
98
See Letter 101a.

-252-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.