The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

127a. MARK ANTOKOLSKY to VLADIMIR STASOV, St. Petersburg

Rome, 6 (18) Feb. 1874

I hasten to express to you from afar my joy, greetings and my congratulations to our Musorgsky. This morning I read in Golos of the performance of Boris Godunov. And in spite of all the critic's desire not to speak the truth, it is nevertheless obvious that the opera has had a tremendous success. I've just read the same thing in S.-Peterburgski Vedomosti, that the opera is definitely a success and that its gifted composer was called several times after each act.

From my own side I also call him to stand on guard before the art of truth and of the people, that which is based on the finest human feelings--on truth and on beauty. Once more I repeat your words: "And with new strength, let us continue our mutual, though diverse, work."18 Once more greetings to the conqueror, I am very, very happy for him and for all new art!

Rome, 16/28 February, 1874

[extract]

I am sorry, very sorry for Musorgsky. Recently I wrote exactly what you have now said: "Why do talents fade away so quickly?" I don't know.--Perhaps it is that only empty hearts beat evenly? Perhaps because consciousness comes to us before knowledge? The soul strains towards freedom, but where is it?--Well, an artist often comes upon a thorny path, first he moves forward, then he grows weary, then he stumbles, grows faint, and falls. Ekh, Russia! it needs so many more victims before it will begin to lead a normal life. Such victims will serve as a platform for the people of the future. This, in my opinion, is the truth, and therefore all the more saddening.

I read the analysis of the opera Boris Godunov in Golos. I think I have never encountered anything more stupid and trivial than this. It is stupid in that the one [Laroche] analyzing the opera nags pettishly at petty things and doesn't realize at all the essence of the opera. It is stupid mainly because he drags in personalities: this is unforgivable, this means that he has no respect for the printed word; and finally, this isn't fair. However, his trivial attitude that "nothingness is realism," and that realism is liberalism and both "try to break the chains of the times"--all this sufficiently proves that it's no use talking about such

____________________
18
In Stasov's dedication of his book on Modern Art in Europe "To Ilya Repin, to Mordukh Antokolsky and to the memory of Hartmann."

-268-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.