The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

Khovanshchina is going well, but there's little time for it, and I get very tired.


140. To LUDMILA SHESTAKOVA

6 December, 1874

MY DEAR LITTLE DOVE,

LUDMILA IVANOVNA!

I have started a treatment for the throat--had to, am growing inaudible. Allow me to drop in on you tomorrow, little dove. Today, I'm taking advantage of the holiday and playing dumb.

I was at our splendid Petrovs on Monday, as I wanted to see Yekaterina Osipovna before her departure,--she's a fine and clever girl,--I showed them a bit of Khovanshchina: it seemed to have their blessing. --I kiss your little hand warmly, little dove of mine.

Your

MUSINKA


141. To ARSENI GOLENISHCHEV-KUTUZOV, Tver

Peter, 29 December, '74

MY DEAR ARSENI,

I promptly inform you that "Hashish" has been very warmly accepted by the editor of Delo, and Blagosvetlov impatiently awaits your return, and I am 1500 puds joyful and also await you. Give your maman my most sincere greetings. In Khovanshchina, the further into the forest, the more firewood; but what about Shuisky? The proofs on our album7 will soon be sent.

Am writing to Miller8--but without being sure [of his address].

Warmly embrace you.

That's all.

MODESTE MUSORGSKY

____________________
7
"Our album" is Sunless, which received the censor's permit on November 23, and was on Bessel's presses.
8
Oreste Miller, a great authority on Russian literature, knew Golenishchev- Kutuzov at the Petersburg University. Musorgsky must have been seeking Miller's advice in behalf of his Khovanshchina or his friend's Shuisky.

-288-

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