The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

monument to the great creator--read the enclosed,14 and it would be good if Dyainka would also read it, and would correct it where necessary. About these corrections, I ask you to give me an answer right away. (What an audacious one I am!) This is a historical article.

Your soul's

MUSINKA

Here in all his true self is Grandpa [ Petrov], forever unofficial, but intimate so that he can speak about art with human society.

Declares MUSINKA


176. To NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

Friend Nikolai Andreyevich, on Monday (May 17) I will be at your place at 8:00 P.M. We must see each other--this is such nonsense! Your task, friend, to communicate the Russian song to the Russian people and to others, is a great consolation to me.15--A blessed, historical service. This beloved thing might be lost, might be lost com

____________________
14
This may be a lost article by Musorgsky, about the relations between Petrov and Glinka, written on the occasion of Petrov's jubilee. Its aim was to enlist sympathy for Shestakova's project to erect a monument to Glinka in his home town of Smolensk.
15
Rimsky-Korsakov's collection was completed the following year: 100 Russian Folk-Songs (Op. 24), collected and harmonized by N. Rimsky-Korsakov; dedicated to V. V. Stasov (who had located rare volumes for it--e, Yakushkin, etc.). The preface is dated St. Petersburg, November 1877. Four songs in the volume were recorded by Musorgsky: 1. "Within the Walls of Kiev," communicated by M. P. Musorgsky, who heard it from Ryabinin; 2. "Volga and Mikula," communicated by M. P. Musorgsky, to whom Ryabinin sang it [used by Musorgsky in the Kromy scene of Boris, sung by Misail and Varlaam]; 11. "There Passed a Maiden," communicated by M. P. Musorgsky, who recorded it as sung by I. F. Gorbunov [used by Musorgsky as Marfa divination aria in Khovanshchina]; 92. "Oh, Bridal Gifts so Splendid, La-du, La-du," communicated by M. P. Musorgsky, who recorded it as sung by M. F. Shishko [used by Musorgsky for the chorus in Act IV, Scene I, of Khovanshchina].

Other songs in this volume that Musorgsky had used in Boris: 18. "See the Proud Eagle Swiftly Soaring," arranged by Balakirev, after P. Yakushkin (Vol. III, 1815) [used by Musorgsky in the Kromy scene]; 45. "Glory Be to God in Heaven," from Johann Pratsch [Jan Prach] (Vol. II, 1815) [used first by Beethoven for the Trio of the scherzo in his E minor quartet, Op. 59, by Musorgsky for the chorus in the coronation scene and later by Rimsky-Korsakov in The Tzar's Bride and the cantata, Slava]; 71. "Pealing Are the Bells in Novgorod," communicated by S. V. Rimskaya-Korsakova [used by Musorgsky for drunken Varlaam's song in the inn scene].

-332-

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