The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

So I went back to my tenor and told him that I hadn't found Musorgsky at home . . .

In the meantime I located one of my colleagues who agreed to stand guard over Musorgsky and bring him to the concert in plenty of time.

Sure enough, Modeste Petrovich showed up promptly at 7 at Kononov's hall where the concert was to take place.

Musorgsky, unfortunately, remained long enough in the greenroom to sample all the drinks on the table there, growing drunker and drunker. Suddenly my Italian tenor, after trying some runs, decided that his voice was a little strained and would therefore be compelled to sing his entire program a half or even a whole tone lower than usual.

This was all we needed.

I rushed to Musorgsky to ask him whether he could do this Kunststück for Ravelli. Rising from his chair with a certain gallantry, Musorgsky calmed me with the words: "Pourquoi pas?" (apparently Musorgsky spoke only French with cultured people, even when he was drunk).

To prove his assuring words he suggested that the tenor at once run through his whole program mezza-voce.

Musorgsky, who was probably hearing all Ravelli's Italian stuff for the first time, so charmed the Italian with his refined performance and his ability to transpose to any key that the tenor embraced him, saying repeatedly: "Che artista!" . . . --VASILI BERTENSSON


187. To VLADIMIR STASOV

Vas. Ostr. 5th line, No. 10

[ December 25, 1876]

MY DEAR généralissime,

I have a petition to place before you. On the corner of Nevsky Prospect and that square where the Mikeshin bell29 is always about to fall, there is a building [the Public Library], and on the roof of that building sits Minerva. Good friends of mine wish to get inside that building and furthermore, into that very department where Your Grace holds sway. I have the honor to introduce my friends: Maria Izmailovna Fyodorova (it is under this lady's hospitable roof that Musoryanin lives), Pavel Alexandrovich Naumov, little Sergei Naumov --in other words, the family where this sinner is cherished. As you, my dear, have never denied people your shining love and keen knowledge, I, Musoryanin, ask you, but only if it doesn't in the least inconvenience you, to arrange this visit to you at the Library on Monday, December 27. I should like to be with my friends when they come to

____________________
29
Mikeshin's monument to Catherine the Great.

-352-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.