Social Studies for the Twenty-First Century: Methods and Materials for Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools

By Jack Zevin | Go to book overview
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Chapter 4
Organizing for Instruction

True, reflective attention . . . always involves judging, reasoning, deliberation; it means that the child has a question of his own and is actively engaged in seeking and selecting relevant material with which to answer it, considering the bearings and relations of this material -- the kind of solution it calls for. The problem is one's own; hence also the impetus, the stimulus to attention, is one's own -- it is discipline, or gain in power of control; that is, a habit of considering problems.

-- John Dewey, The School and Society
VERVIEW OF CONTENTS
Main Ideas
Grouping for Instruction: Choosing Group Dynamics
Independent Projects
Task-Oriented Small Groups/Committee Work: Cooperative Learning
Role-Play
Simulation
Mock Trials
Developing Questions
Didactic Questions
Reflective Questions
Affective Questions
Summary
Notes
For Further Study: Organizing for Instruction

MAIN IDEAS

The theme of this chapter is organizing for instruction, which deals primarily with selecting roles for students to play and designing the types of questions they will be asked to consider. Just as you can play many parts in the classroom, students can be organized in many ways -- as individuals, in small groups, or as members of a gaming team. The organization you choose will strongly influence how students interact with you, each other, and the subject matter. Examples of different dynamics include independent projects, small group discussions, role-play, and simulation games, or mock trials. Each seeks to achieve reflective

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