The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet

By Monroe E. Price | Go to book overview
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Acknowledgements

This book is a publication of the new Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, Oxford University, located at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, which has been so extraordinarily careful in shepherding the V-chip's path in Canada, was willing to support the assembling of this book of essays. That is fitting because of the important contribution of the Canadian experience especially its early field testing of the system and the way its innovation, experience, and experimentation with the V-chip has led to an international pattern of inquiry concerning the technology. The essays are also, in part, the product of a symposium held under the auspices of the Howard M. Squadron Program on Law, Media and Society at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York. That symposium received funding from the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation. Mark Szafran was one of the principal organizers of that symposium and helped locate many of the writers included in this volume. Michelle Graham not only edited some of those papers into an issue of the Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal, but played a very considerable role in preparing manuscripts for this book. In addition, I participated in a seminar on the V-chip at the Freedom Forum's Media Studies Center where I later became a Fellow (and completed work on this book). The very able Melissa Mathis, assisted by Tamara Bock and Benno Weisberg, saw the project to conclusion. I want to thank, as well, Danielle Cliche, then research manager of the International Institute of Communications in London, who had the splendid idea of uniting these papers with the interests and support of the CRTC and was responsible for the book's creation. The book is dedicated to Edith Bjornson, Senior Program Officer of the Markle Foundation, for her extraordinary and persistent efforts to nourish scholarly understanding and humane administration of the wholesale and society-transforming changes that bewilder all of us in a time of rapidly changing communications technologies.

-vii-

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