The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet

By Monroe E. Price | Go to book overview

Another fundamental factor was that television programming produced in Canada is not, for the most part, very violent. Canadian children's programming in particular has an international reputation for its quality and nonviolent approach to storytelling. While there was concern expressed from the production community that a classification regime would result in constraints on creativity, the focus of the debate in Canada stayed on the protection of young children under the age of twelve. The producers were constantly reassured by the broadcast regulator that it had no interest in telling adults what they could or could not watch.

The final reason was that in the United States, for whatever reason, the issue became a political football. Members of Congress and senators became instant experts on program classification, and each asserted they knew best what the parents of America needed. For the conservative right and family values advocates in particular, television was an easy and convenient target for what ailed America. The Dan Quayle/Murphy Brown fight had not gone away.

In Canada, how television programs should be classified was a nonstarter as a political issue. With some trepidation, the broadcast industry had released the details of its ratings system submission to the CRTC right in the middle of a federal election campaign. It was a timetable not of their choosing, but the deadline for filing the AGVOT report had been set long before the election was called. However, the politicians ignored the whole classification issue. It was not raised once during the campaign and continues to remain only a hillock on the Canadian political landscape.


Notes
1
Television and Violence -- A Few Primary Considerations, Jacques DeGuise, Professor, Department of Information & Communications, Université Laval. Excerpted from Summary and Analysis of Various Studies of Violence and Television, published by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, June 1991.
2
More information on the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council can be found at its Web site: .
3
"Progress on Implementation of a Television Programming Classification System and the V-chip in Canada". AGVOT Report to the CRTC, September 6, 1996.
4
Television Violence: A Review of the Effects on Children of Different Ages. Report for the Department of Canadian Heritage.
5
"Canadian Public Attitudes Toward a Classification System for Television". Environics Research Group, June 1994.
6
A list of participating program services in the five test markets is in Appendix 4 of the AGVOT Report to the CRTC, April 30, 1997.
7
The full research reports are appended to the AGVOT April 30 report to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.
8
CRTC Public Notice 1997-80.
9
Media Awareness Network Web site: .

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 363

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.