The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet

By Monroe E. Price | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
The V-Chip and Television Ratings: British and European Perspectives

Andrea Millwood Hargrave


BACKGROUND

The United Kingdom has one of the most regulated broadcasting environments in the world. The British Broadcasting Corporation (the BBC) self-regulates through its Board of Governors. The Independent Television Commission (the ITC) grants licenses to, and regulates, the commercial television sector, including satellite-delivered services. The Broadcasting Standards Commission1 (the BSC)acts as an independent body, established by statute, to consider complaints from the public on the issue of standards in broadcasting (such as the portrayal of violence, of sex and of matters of taste and decency, including bad language, stereotyping, and areas such as the treatment of disasters), and to consider complaints and offer redress on the question of unfair or unjust treatment in programs and unwarranted infringements of privacy. In addition, the BSC must monitor program content and may undertake research into all the areas within its remit, which covers all television, radio, cable, and satellite services.

Each of the regulatory bodies -- the BBC, the ITC, and the BSC -- produces a Code of Practice or guidelines that cover the areas within its remit. Each is aimed at slightly different audiences. The BBC's reflects its role as regulator and broadcaster, with detailed producer guidelines in certain areas. The ITC's reflects its role as licensor of commercial broadcasting. The BSC's Code of Practice aims to provide general principles for program makers but seeks to avoid what has been described as "the chilling effect" (an inherent danger to creativity in proscriptive regulation). The code seeks to reflect the BSC's role as a consumer voice, providing guidance and a framework within which broadcasters may work. It is laid down in the statute that the codes produced by the BSC must be reflected

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 363

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.