Handbook of Pain Syndromes: Biopsychosocial Perspectives

By Andrew R. Block; Edwin F. Kremer et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Preface

Pain is both a curse and a blessing. At its best, pain serves to warn of real or impending tissue damage. Through its motivational and aversive aspects, pain compels individuals to take action, avoiding a worsening of damage, and/or beginning the process of restoration of damaged tissues. Unfortunately, pain's value as a warning signal is limited, and it may have exceedingly negative consequences. There are many situations, such as cancers, in which an individual can experience extreme and even life-threatening pathophysiology, without the perception of pain. An opposite problem may occur. Some individuals experience pain in the absence of any pathophysiological process, as in the case of somatoform pain disorder. Finally, many patients with tissue damage or a disease process may experience protracted disabling pain, leading to a downward spiral of emotional malaise, decreased physical function, and psychosocial upheaval.

Pain is ubiquitous. As the chapter by LeResche and VonKorff in the present volume demonstrates, pain can strike almost any organ system, and afflicts the young and old alike. The universal and aversive nature of pain has led to rapid development of the field of pain management.

Pain is complex. As discussed in the chapter by Riley and Robinson, pain is no longer considered a simple sensory occurrence. Rather, the most widely accepted current framework for the understanding of pain is now the biopsychosocial model. According to this model, nociception serves as a starting point for a series of events that culminate in the patient's perception of pain and overt pain behaviors. In the process, the pain experience is influenced by a) physical factors involved in pain signal transmission, b) psychological and emotional factors involved in the interpretation of pain signals, and c) environmental factors that provide incentives or disincentives for recovery.

The biopsychosocial model serves as a guide for the current volume. Part I of this volume provides in-depth coverage of some of the major psychosocial factors influencing pain syndromes. Financial and economic factors influencing pain syndromes are discussed in the chapter by Hadjistavropolous. Craig, Hill, and McMurtry both discuss how pain pa

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Pain Syndromes: Biopsychosocial Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 692

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?