Assessment of Authentic Performance in School Mathematics

By Richard Lesh; Susan J. Lamon | Go to book overview

tors of assessments. Most assessments conducted by school psychologists, evaluators, and administrators provide little information of any value to classroom teachers. Yet the classroom teacher can have the most immediate effect upon children's learning. Assessments therefore should be made relevant to teachers, and teachers should learn to conduct assessments. But to appreciate these assessments and to use them well, teachers need to understand a good deal about children's mathematical thinking. It does little good to provide a teacher with information concerning strategy if the teacher does not understand what strategy is. Consequently, a major effort needs to be made in the area of teacher education. Teachers need to learn not only "math methods" but "children's methods"--that is, the ways in which children go about making sense of the world of school mathematics.


REFERENCES

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Behr, M. J., Lesh, R., Post, T. R., and Silver, EA. ( 1983). "Rational number systems". In R. Lesh and M. Landau (Eds.), Acquisition of mathematics concepts and processes. NY: Academic Press.

Carraher, T. N., Carraher, D. W., and Schliemann, A. S. ( 1985). "Mathematics in streets and schools". British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 3, 21-29.

Connelly, A. J., Nachtman, W., and Pritchett, E. M. ( 1976). KeyMath Diagnostic Arithmetic Test. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.

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Ginsburg, H. P. ( 1989). Children's arithmetic: How they learn it and how you teach it. ( 2nd ed.). Austin, TX: Pro Ed.

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Ginsburg, H. P. ( 1990). "Assessment probes and instructional activities". The test of early mathematics ability, ( 2nd Ed.) Austin, TX: Pro Ed.

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Hatano, B. ( 1988). "Social and motivational bases for mathematical understanding". In G. Saxe and M. Gearhart (Eds.), Children's mathematics. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

Kaplan, R. G., Burgess, P., and Ginsburg, H. P. ( 1988). "Children's mathematical representations are not (always) mathematical". Genetic Epistemologist, 16, 7-14.

Kaplan, R. G., Yamamoto, TA., and Ginsburg, H. P., ( 1989). "Teaching mathematics concepts". In L. B. Resnick and L. E. Klopfer (Eds.) Toward the thinking curriculum: Current cognitive research. 1989 Yearbook of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

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