Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

In fact, important differences persisted between Chatham and the Rockinghams. Both wished to extricate British troops from America to be ready to confront the French, but Chatham clung to his desperate hope that this might somehow be done without finally losing the allegiance of the colonists. Many times and woefully he repeated that it was probably too late, but still he would not, could not, accept the idea of severance. It gave him "unspeakable concern," he told Richmond, to differ with him so profoundly; still, he promised him to do his best to come to Westminster. . . .

Supported by his human crutches, his son William and son-in- law Mahon, he struggled to the House of Lords on that day. . . . Then Chatham spoke, falteringly, with obvious difficulty and more even than usual references to his infirmities. . . . [That] if peace with the House of Bourbon could not be preserved with honour, why could not war be declared without hesitation? "Any state is better than despair; . . . and if we fall, let us fall like men."

Richmond spoke again, pointing out that even the great name of Chatham was hardly sufficient in itself to guarantee victory "without an army, without a navy, and without money." It would now be France, Spain, and America against Britain; a situation disastrously changed since 1756. Chatham, in some turmoil, struggled to raise himself again to answer the Duke, succeded at last in getting to his feet, but was unable to stay on them, pressed his hand to his heart, swayed alarmingly, sank back, and was prevented from falling to the floor only by the rescuing arms of neighbouring peers. 1


Note
1
'Editor's note. There is a considerable literature on the elder Pitt. Among the more important secondary sources are Peter Brown, William Pitt, Earl of Chatham ( 1978) which should be augmented by his volume The Chathamites ( 1967); also O. A. Sherrard , Lord Chatham and America ( 1958) which is the last in his trilogy begun in 1952; and reprinted by Greenwood Press; and Sir John Plumb, Chatham ( 1953). Several earlier studies still valuable are W. C. B.Tunstall, William Pitt, Earl of Chatham ( 1938); and Basil Williams, Life of William Pit, Earl of Chatham ( 1913),2 volumes, and reprinted by F. Cass and Octagon Pressin 1966. Helpful in understanding the age of Pitt are Stanley Ayling, George III ( 1972); J. Brooke, King 2 ( 1972); Richard Pares , King George III and the Politicians ( 1953); Ian Christie, Crisis of Empire: Great Britain and the Colonies, 1754-1784

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.