Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

Edmund Burke, like Pitt, was genuinely alarmed by events in the colonies; unlike Pitt, however, this "Tory Whig" saw the American revolt primarily in terms of the domestic politics of his time. For Burke the ultra-conservatism of ensconced parliamentary leadership also became the single most important cause for colonial discontent, and he strongly felt that colonial leadership bravely stood its ground, as did all true Whigs, in justified defiance against threatened rights and liberties guaranteed all by the "glorious" revolution of 1688. As Gerald Chapman underscores the point in this perceptive study, those who read Burke seriously can only stand in awe at his grasp of the growth of colonial society in all its manifestations. Not only did he find America "singular," but he asked the most singular question of his age. As Burke phrased it, "the question is not whether their spirit deserves praise or blame, but -- what in the name of God shall we do with it?"

And American leadership could only applaude Burke as an ally in reading his Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents, especially his summary of the acts of Parliament: "the scheme of the junto under consideration . . . strikes a palsy into every nerve of our constitution." Burke, of course, fixed the blame for the irresponsible governing of empire squarely on the growing problem of misgovernment. Like Franklin, Burke sought some sort of balance, and felt that British supremacy and American liberty were not incompatible. But his essential pessimism was expressed in the now classic sentence: "Great empire and little minds go ill together." Unlike his famous contemporary, the historian Edward Gibbon, who felt that after France was again at war with England that I thought there was no disgrace in becoming the advocate of my country against a foreign enemy," Burke was convinced that the renewed conflict with France would strengthen the Crown at the expense of Parliament and thus further endanger English liberties. After 1778 Burke dropped his efforts for American autonomy and declared himself unreservedly for American independence.

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.