Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

The student of the American Revolution who cares to lift his or her eyes away from the colonial scene is often surprised by the objectivity of English newspapers. And this was true not only on the eve of the Revolution, but during a good part of the war for independence. It was only after England again went to war with France in 1778 that sthe colonies lost some of the valuable support which resulted from this objectivity. As the historian, Edward Gibbon, perhaps expressed it best with the remark that "I thought there was no disgrace in becoming the advocate of my country against a foreign enemy."

Every important paper in England published letters on the front page, largely reflecting the opinions of men in public life, and mostly signed with Roman pseudonyms. Lacking the editorial so familiar today, these letters were practically the only expressions of opinion to appear in the English newspaper during this age (and much quoted in America). Indeed the letter remained a characteristic feature of English journalism during the entire revolutionary period.

Among the most prominent and, perhaps, the most impartial was H. S. Woodfall Public Advertizer. According to the Cambridge History of English Literature, "merit and immunity from the law of libel were the only conditions exacted." The fact that during this period so much of the opinion was favorable toward the colonies is a matter of considerable significance, although it must be understood that frequently pro-American feeling was simply a vehicle used by political factions in conflict over largely English issues.

In the decade preceding the Declaration of Independence the newspapers fell far short of general interest in colonial grievances. The Stamp Act of 1765 was the exception for, after all, it was the first important contest with respect to the constitutionality of English policy. The response to the Boston Tea Party, however, opened a new chapter in the British press which did not subside until England went to war again with France in 1778. The numerous letters published during this period suggest that pro-American sympathy largely represented anti-ministerial feeling and Whig reaction to "monarchical oppression." Indeed the "outs" in English political life found in the American cause a potent means to express domestic discontent; thus

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.