Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century

By William Smart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
1802. A BREATHING SPACE

AFTER prolonged negotiations, during which the actions of Buonaparte gave rise to much suspicion, and the enthusiasm over the peace began to cool, the Definitive Treaty was signed in April at Amiens. The army and navy received the thanks of Parliament; the militia and fencibles were disbanded; and the reduction of the regular troops to a peace footing was announced. "At Amiens," said Napoleon afterwards, "I believed in truth that the fate of France and of Europe, as well as my own, were fixed. The wars once over, I meant to give myself up entirely to the affairs of France, and I believe I should have worked wonders (enfanté des prodigues)."

The Definitive Treaty.

The Budget, which was framed with Pitt's full approval, was introduced late in the year -- on 5th April -- on account of the uncertainty attending the final negotiations, and the doubt whether the nation would have to provide for a war or for a peace establishment. Even then, Addington contented himself with enumerating the sums already voted for army, navy, ordnance, and miscellaneous services, which provided only for five months of the year, leaving the other seven unestiniated for -- merely assuring the House that every retrenchment practicable would be made.1

Budget.

Its chief interest was the immediate repeal of the obnoxious Income Tax. Experience of its working does not seem to have made it any more popular. Pitt, indeed, did not cease to maintain that it was founded on " a principle which no man had yet by any solid argument disputed." But it was resented by many even as a temporary tax for an emergency. At any rate, nothing, it was thought, could excuse it but actual war, and,

Repeal of Income Tax.

____________________
1
Hansard, xxxvi. 445.

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 778

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.