Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century

By William Smart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
1804. PAUSE

IN the early part of the year, war and the preparation for war shut out everything else from public consideration. A recurrence of the King's malady added to the general gloom. Hansard is filled with endless debates on the volunteers and militia, the policy as to the regular army, and the "mismanagement of the navy."

In the Budget of 30th April,1 Addington asked for a total Supply of £41,000,000; £4,711,000 to be raised on account of Ireland, leaving £36,283,000 on account of Great Britain. The chief items in the joint charges were:

Budget

Navy £11,715,000
Army, England 15,256,000
Army, Ireland 3,887,000
Ordnance, England 3,693,000
Ordnance, Ireland 369,000
Vote of Credit 2,500,000
Miscellaneous, England and Ireland 883,000
Irish permanent grants 400,000

As regards Ways and Means, the yield of the war taxes (customs, excise, and property tax) estimated at (customs, excise, and property tax) estimated at £14,440,000, he proposed to "invigorate by the addition of a million," to be got by another -- the fifth -- addition to the duty on wines (£11 18/6 per tun on French, and £7 19/- on other wines),2 and by another

____________________
1
Hansard, ii. 345.
2
The feeling with which the high duties on wine were regarded was amusingly expressed in a memorial in the following year to the House of Lords, "signed by a number of officers in the army, praying, on account of the high price of wine, and on account of the excessive duties, a drawback with respect to the latter in their favour." The Earl of Suffolk lamented that the price of the article was now so high that a subaltern officer could not afford to indulge himself with a glass of wine. (It seems that the remission was actually enjoyed in the navy.) Hansard, v. 45, 123.

-76-

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