Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century

By William Smart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
1808. THE BREAK IN THE CLOUDS

WHEN Parliament assembled on 21st January, the Speech from the Throne referred to the intention of the enemy, as declared in the Treaty of Tilsit, to combine the powers of Europe in one general confederacy against Great Britain, and congratulated the nation on the successful execution of the "painful but necessary service," the taking of the Danish fleet, while the fleet of Portugal, "destined by France to be employed as an instrument of vengeance against Great Britain," had been secured from the grasp of France, and was now "conveying to its American dominions the hopes and fortunes of the Portuguese monarch." It was matter of regret that the Prussian and Austrian Ministers had demanded their passports without assigning any distinct cause for that proceeding. The King of Sweden, however, had resisted every attempt to induce him to abandon his alliance. The United States Commissioners, on 31st December, 1806, had signed a Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, but the President had refused to ratify it. The cause of the refusal was not, however, "the unauthorised act of force committed against an American ship of war" -- this was the capture of the Chesapeake. by the Leopard --for which, indeed, His Majesty had offered immediate and spontaneous reparation, but an attempt to "connect, with the question which had arisen out of this act, pretensions inconsistent with the mercantile rights of Great Britain," which His Majesty was determined never to admit." Notwithstanding all difficulties, the resources of the country had continued during the last year to be so abundant as to have produced, both from the permanent and temporary revenue, a receipt considerably larger than that of the preceding year.1

King's Speech.

____________________
1
Hansard, x. 1.

-162-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 778

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.