Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century

By William Smart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
1814. THE PASSING OF THE GREAT SHADOW

THE New Year dawned with prospects such as Europe had not seen for many a year. Four great armies had invaded the soil of France, and were closing in on its heart. Public expectation was raised to the highest pitch. The British fleet had reached its greatest strength, and represented a "force more than equivalent to the navies of all the other European powers combined." The end was evidently not far off.

Invasion of France.

After some fruitless negotiation with Napoleon at Chatillonsur-Seine, during an armistice, a permanent basis was given to the alliance by the Treaty of Chaumont, signed on 1st March -- "the most important contract that perhaps the history of European diplomacy could furnish," said Castlereagh -- by which the four powers bound themselves, by a twenty years' treaty, not to lay down their arms till the object of the war was attained, and engaged, each of them, to keep 150,000 effective men in the field, independent of garrisons, Great Britain besides guaranteeing £5,000,000 a year for every subsequent year of the war, to be divided equally among the other three powers.

Treaty of Chaumont.

On 31st March, the allied powers entered Paris with much ceremonial, amid acclamations of the crowd, and a proclamation was issued saying that they would not treat with Napoleon or his family; that they would respect the integrity of ancient France as it existed under its legitimate kings; and that they would recognise and guarantee the constitution which the French people might adopt. On 2nd April, the French Senate formally announced that Napoleon Buonaparte had forfeited the throne, and that the hereditary right established in his family was abolished. When Napoleon arrived at Fontainebleau with the wreck of his army, the Allies were in possession of Paris, and, after a long hesitation, he abdicated on the 7th.

The Allies enter Paris.

Abdication of Napoleon.

-390-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Annals of the Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 778

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.