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The Account: Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's Relación

By Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca; Martin A. Favata et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT
What Happened to the Others
Who Went to the Indies

Since I have given an account of everything above concerning the voyage and the entrance into and the departure from the land until my return to these kingdoms, I wish likewise to furnish a record and account of what the people and the ships who remained there did. 1 I have not mentioned this above because we knew nothing about them until we had come out. We found many of them in New Spain and others here in Castile. From these people we learned what happened, how it happened and how things ended.

We left the three ships--because the other one had already been lost on the breakers--which remained at great risk, with little food and up to one hundred persons on board, among them ten married women. One of them had told the Governor many things that happened on the voyage before they happened. When he wanted to enter the land, she told him not to, because she believed that none of those who went with him would leave that land. She believed that if anyone should get out, God would perform very great miracles for him, but she believed that few or none would escape. The Governor then answered her that he and all those who were penetrating the country with him were going to fight and conquer many very strange lands and peoples. He said that he was very sure that in conquering them many would die, but that the survivors would be fortunate and would be very rich, since he had heard that there were many riches in that land. The Governor went further and asked her to tell him who had told her the things she had said about the past and the future. She replied that in Castile a Moorish woman from Hornachos 2 had told her. She had told us this before we left Castile, and the entire voyage went the way she predicted.

After the Governor left Carvallo, a native of Cuenca de Huete, 3 as his lieutenant and captain of all the ships and people that he left there, we departed from them. The Governor had given them orders that they should then all assemble in the ships and continue their journey directly in the

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