Beyond Confrontation: International Law for the Post-Cold War Era

By Lori Fisler Damrosch; Gennady M. Danilenko et al. | Go to book overview

2
Consent and the Creation of International Law
Jonathan I. Charney and Gennady M. Danilenko
I. Introduction
An inquiry into the theory of consent in international law raises some of the most difficult questions with regard to this law. Generations of international lawyers have viewed consent in the context of a system that is said to be based on the idea that state sovereignty is the preeminent feature of international law and relations. According to the traditional view, a state is said to be free to do anything unless it has consented to restrict its own behavior. Under this approach a rule of international law is binding upon a state only if it has consented to it.Constitutional principles relating to sources of international law lend support to this view. According to the prevailing opinion, the basic norm on sources is reflected in Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice. Under this article, the I.C.J., "whose function is to decide in accordance with international law such disputes as are submitted to it," is to apply:
international conventions, whether general or particular, establishing rules expressly recognized by the contesting states;
international custom, as evidence of a general practice accepted as law;
the general principles of law recognized by civilized nations . . .1

These "positive law tests"2 of Article 38 appear to reflect the view that all rules of international law are created by the consent of states. In the case of conventions, Article 38 requires express recognition by the con

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond Confrontation: International Law for the Post-Cold War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes xx
  • Acknowledgments xxiii
  • About the Editors and Contributors xxv
  • 1 - The Role of International Law In the Contemporary World 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Consent and the Creation Of International Law 23
  • Notes 53
  • 3 - Participants in International Legal Relations 61
  • Notes 82
  • 4 - Legal Regulation of the Use of Force 93
  • Notes 134
  • 5 - International Cooperation Against Terrorism 141
  • Notes 158
  • 6 - Stability in the Law of the Sea 165
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - Enviornmental Law 193
  • Notes 217
  • 8 - Tensions in the Development Of the Law of Outer Space 225
  • Notes 257
  • 9 - International Human Rights 275
  • Notes 299
  • 10 - Peaceful Settlement of Disputes Through the Rule of Law 309
  • Notes 332
  • About the Book 335
  • Index 337
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 345

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.