Seeking Common Ground: Canada-U.S. Trade Dispute Settlement Policies in the Nineties

By Andrew D. M. Anderson | Go to book overview

United States by the U.S. administrative agencies.

Because of a lack of data, it was not possible to obtain a clear picture of the number of affirmative preliminary AD or CVD cases by Canada against the United States. In general, however, the number of Canadian affirmative AD cases against the United States is greater than for the United States against Canada: approximately 65 percent of all final AD cases. The CITT over the last five years appears to not only have made a major effort to clean up its administrative practices when handling AD cases, but to have thoroughly reviewed the AD cases that were already on the books: consequently, Canada has substantially reduced the actual number of AD cases in place from 156 at its peak over the 1979 through 1990 period to 74 cases at the end of 1990. However, it can still be expected to have future U.S. cases brought to the table. It will also take a number of years to assess whether the trend in the reduction of AD cases in effect will continue over the 1990s. To the extent that U.S. producers have cases brought against them in Canada, they are assured a five-year sunset provision unless extensive evidence is shown to warrant the continuation of the duty. Until the United States signs the proposed Subsidies Code in the 1994 GATT Uruguay Round Agreements, Canadian producers do not have the benefit of a sunset clause provision in the United States. For more on this issue see Chapter 7.

Chapter 3 contrasts the procedures used to administer the U.S. and Canadian "unfair" trade laws to see whether they have been contributing toward protectionism in Canada and the United States.


Notes
1.
See Nivola ( 1992), for an analysis of the unfair trade laws in the United States.
2.
For more on this issue, see Grey ( 1982a, 1982b, and 1986).
3.
Cohen ( 1981) provides an interesting analysis of the context of U.S. international economic policy, and in chapter 8 of his book provides a good review of the 1980 trade reorganisation effort by the United States. For a general overview of U.S. trade laws, see Pomeranz ( 1988).
4.
United States (1890: Section 237 and 1897: Section 5).
5.
For further discussions on the 1974 Trade Act, see Koh ( 1986).
6.
Rivers and Greenwald ( 1979) provide an overview of the negotiations to require the United States to adopt a material injury requirement. For an overview of the anti-circumvention additions to the 1988 Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act, see Cameron and Crawford ( 1989).
7.
For further discussions of the Act, see Patterson ( 1984).
9.
For a discussion of some of the major changes in U.S. Section 201, see Rosenthal and Gilbert ( 1989).
10.
An interesting analysis of the possible "protectionist" effects of the U.S. Trade and Tariff Act of 1984 on Latin American countries, including a discussion of Section 301, is found in Mendoza ( 1986). Bliss ( 1989) recommends that nations challenge the

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seeking Common Ground: Canada-U.S. Trade Dispute Settlement Policies in the Nineties
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.