The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837

By James Roger Sharp | Go to book overview

SONG FROM A JACKSON BARBECUE
SEPTEMBER 25, 1839
Hard times, hard times is all the cry, Shall corporations rule the soil
The country's in confusion, That Washington defended;
The Banks have stop'd, but still they try Shall honest people sweat and toil;
To mistify delusion. And have their rights suspended;
They give us trash and keep our cash, Shall we be slaves to pampered knaves,
To send across the waters, And Banks still be our masters,
To pay for things they bought of Kings, Since all they pay from day to day,
And gull our sons and daughters. Is nothing but Shinplasters?
Then to the Polls, you noble souls; Then to the Polls, you noble souls;
The Banks they cry for quarters; The Banks they cry for quarters;
But here's their doom, they shall resume, And here's their doom, they shall resume,
Or forfeit all their charters. Or forfeit all their charters.
Crave Jackson fought to set us free --
He loves his country dearly;
His own metallic currency
Is not a promise merely.
But little Van's an honest man,
He'll imitate the Hero.
And lay the Banks that play such pranks
All just as low as Zero.
Then to the Polls, you noble souls,
The Banks they cry for quarters;
But here's their doom, they shall resume,
Or forfeit all their charters.
Quoted in the Jackson Mississippian, October 11, 1839

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The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Graphs and Maps xiv
  • Song from a Jackson Barbecue September 25, 1839 *
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - The Democratic Party and the Politics of Agrarianism 3
  • Chapter II - Banking Before the Panic 25
  • The West 51
  • Chapter III - Mississippi 55
  • Chapter IV - Mississippi Constituencies 89
  • Chapter V - The Southwest 110
  • Chapter VI - Ohio 123
  • Chapter VII - Ohio Constituencies 160
  • Chapter VIII - The Northwest 190
  • The East 211
  • Chapter IX - Virginia 215
  • Chapter X - Virginia Constituencies 247
  • Chapter XI - The Southeast 274
  • Chapter XII - Pennsylvania and New York 285
  • Chapter XIII - The Northeast 306
  • Conclusion 321
  • Appendices 331
  • Notes to Tables 342
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 379
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