The True Voice of Feeling: Studies in English Romantic Poetry

By Herbert Read | Go to book overview

Index
'Above the Dock' (Hulme), 113
'Abstraction in Science and Abstraction in Art' ( Langer), 152n
Abstraktion und Einfũhlung ( Worringer) 123
Acton, Lord, 300
Adjectives, Pound's principle concerning, 126
Adonais ( Shelley), 228-9, 233, 268, 276; evidence of unconscious homosexuality in, 250-1; the Preface to, 226
'Aesthetic distance', 34
Ages of the World, The ( Schelling), 174
Alastor ( Shelley), 221-2, 223, 250n; narcissism in, 257
Aldington, Richard, 120
Aloofness, see Objectivity
A Lume Spento ( Pound), 105
Ancient Mariner, The ( Coleridge), 25, 26, 27, 28
'Andenken' ( Höderlin), 52
'Angst' symptom, 297
Antiphonal structure ( Whitman's), 99
Antony and Cleopatra ( Shakespeare), 74, 140, 141
Ariosto, 68, 286
Aristotle, 79, 149, 186, 187, 282
Arnold, Matthew, 87, 88, 89n, 130; on Shelley, 214-15, 277
Art and the Evolution of Man ( Read), 20n
Art: as 'copula', 181, 182; as eternal creative power, 16 seqq.; automatism in, 23; evolutionary function of, 20
Aspects of Form, 22n
Associationist psychology, see Hartley
As You Like It, 189
'Atomising', 112, 113
Autobiography ( Wordsworth's), 190
Avoidance of actuality ( Shelley's), 285
Bacon, Sir Francis, 220
Baillie, Hopkins's letters to A. W. M., 76
Baillie, Joanna, 300
Ballads and 'the natural', 25
Barry, Iris, 122n
Beatty, Professor, 201
Beaumont and Fletcher, 29; Coleridge on, 176-7
Behmen, Jacob, 306
'Bellaires, The' ( Pound), 129
Bentham, J., 210
Beppo ( Byron), 311
Bergson, H., 108, 148, 185, 188
Biographia Literaria, 18, 19, 19 n, 24, 29, 29 n, 33, 42, 158, 160, 164, 166, 172, 173, 174, 175, 178, 182, 184
Biron (Marshal), 292
Blake, William, 195
Blank verse, 24, 28, 29, 30, 46-50, 52, 60
'Blessed Damozel, The' ( Rossetti), 79
'Blind Highland Boy, The' ( Wordsworth), 44
Boehme, Jakob, 164
Bolman, F. de W., 174, 174n, 180, 184, 185, 187

-367-

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