Contesting Politics: Women in Ireland, North and South

By Yvonne Galligan; Eilís Ward et al. | Go to book overview

10
Gender and Party Politics in Northern Ireland

RICK WILFORD AND YVONNE GALLIGAN

The political dynamics of the divided society of Northern Ireland are markedly different from those obtaining in the Republic of Ireland. For that reason the opportunities and the constraints confronting women in the public realm of politics are, in turn, more limited and more formidable. Yet over the longer run in terms of numerical representation, the records of women on both sides of the border are not entirely dissimilar even though Northern Ireland has been denied a regional parliament since 1972 and women have fared badly at national and, more recently, European levels in comparison with their counterparts in the Republic.

If we apply the hybrid model of party policies towards women elaborated in Chapter 9, namely gender reinforcement, gender neutrality, gender recognition, and gender facilitation, broad comparisons of similarity and difference may also be inferred in terms of women's interest representation within parties on each sidof the border. This can be accomplished in two ways: indirectly by examining the position of women within the various party hierarchies in Northern Ireland and more directly by exploring party policies on gender issues.


The Party System

Before turning to the first of these measures, we will underline briefly the distinctiveness of Northern Ireland's political system and, more particularly, the effects this system exerts on women, whether or not they are active in the realms of overt politics. Perhaps the most convenient, but nonetheless relevant, point is that the party system is a dual one: that is, there are endogenous and exogenous dimensions to the pattern of electoral competition within Northern Ireland's segmented society. In effect,

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contesting Politics: Women in Ireland, North and South
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.