Contesting Politics: Women in Ireland, North and South

By Yvonne Galligan; Eilís Ward et al. | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

Mary Clancy is a history graduate of University College Galway. She has contributed to Women Surviving (1990), UCG Women's Studies Review (1995), and Galway: History and Society (1996). She teaches courses in women's history and is researching women's political and social activism in County Galway from the 1890s through the 1920s.

Alpha Connelly is a member of the Equality Studies Centre, University College Dublin. From 1992 to 1996 she was research counsellor to the Law Reform Commission of Ireland. She was previously a lecturer in the Faculty of Law at University College Cardiff and in the Faculty of Law at University College Dublin. She was a member of the Constitution Review Group, the report of which was published in 1996.

Eileen Connolly lectures in public policy in the Business School at Dublin City University and is researching a doctoral dissertation on gender and the state in Ireland. She is organiser of the annual "Women and Politics" conference of the Political Studies Association of Ireland.

Paula Devine is currently working in the Centre for Child Care Research and worked previously in the Centre for Social Research, both parts of the Queen's University of Belfast. She has coedited three volumes on findings from the Northern Ireland Social Attitudes Survey and has, in addition, coauthored two chapters in Social Attitudes in Northern Ireland: The Sixth Report (1997).

Freda Donoghue is the research officer in the National College of Industrial Relations in Dublin. She holds a doctorate from the University of Leicester for her thesis on agency temporary workers. Her work in the NCIR has focused mainly on the voluntary sector, older people, and gender. Her publications include Women and Political Participation in Northern Ireland (1996) cowritten with Rick Wilford and Bob Miller of Queen's University, Belfast.

Yvonne Galligan is a research fellow at the Policy Institute, Trinity College Dublin, and lecturer in comparative politics in the Department of Political Science, Trinity College Dublin. Her main research interests lie in the field of public policy. She has published extensively on women in Irish politics, including Women and Politics in Contemporary Ireland: From the Margins to the Mainstream (1998).

Frances Gardiner is research associate in the Department of Political Science, Trinity College Dublin. She has published on women and politics in Ireland and is contributing editor to Sex Equality Policy in Western Europe (1997). She is Irish representative on the EU Commission and FCZB Berlin network on Women in Decision Making. She is coproducer of an EU-funded multimedia distance learning programme entitled "Gender and Politics" and also coproducer of the first open learning course "Comparative European Gender and Politics". She is con

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