Greek Ideals and Modern Life

By R. W. Livingstone | Go to book overview

II THE GROWING INFLUENCE OF HELLENISM

THERE are two views of life, and only two, which have won the allegiance of large masses of mankind in the West. Of these one comes from Palestine, the other from Greece. They are different though not incompatible. We owe to them the noblest patterns of life which Europe has produced and almost all that is vital in our civilization. In religion Palestine stands first; but the greatness of the achievements of Greece in the spiritual as well as in the intellectual and the artistic world is often forgotten. For the enthusiasm which its admirers feel for Hellenism -- sciunt cui crediderunt -- is more than equalled by the ignorance of the public about it. To the public Latin and Greek are 'the classics', grouped together without discrimination, ranked chronologically in the wrong order, and labelled 'dead languages', which, thanks to the mortmain of tradition and the conservatism of the schools, a large number of boys and girls still learn -- both languages fortunately, and especially Greek, in diminishing numbers. The educated know better. Yet even they sometimes forget that the least difference between Greek and Latin is linguistic, that their properties and powers are quite unlike, that the

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Greek Ideals and Modern Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II- The Growing Influence Of Hellenism 11
  • II - Greek Humanism 42
  • IV - Humanism in Politics And Economics 92
  • V - The Twentieth Century and The Age of Plato; an Analogy 116
  • VI - Christianity and Hellenism 144
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