Revelation Restored: Divine Writ and Critical Responses

By David Weiss Halivni | Go to book overview

Introduction

This book explores the editorial policy evident in the canonization of the Hebrew Pentateuch, as well as the various traditions in Jewish law and lore that grew out of the circumstances surrounding this canonization. Yet even as it seeks an understanding of the human agencies necessarily involved in the earliest preservation, arrangement, and interpretation of the Pentateuch, this book presupposes that to speak of such agencies is not necessarily to belie the divinity of the scriptural word. Indeed, this book achieves its unique perspective by investigating a continual relationship between the human stewardship of the scriptures and their divine origin. To a large extent, the project arises from the work that was begun in Peshat and Derash: Plain and Applied Meaning in Rabbinic Exegesis and, in particular, from some of the ideas that were raised in the theological segment of that book. Critics have raised important questions requiring clarification, and the following pages will respond to some of these concerns while presenting an approach to the history of the Hebrew canon and its interpretation that should stand on its own as a contribution to modern Jewish thought, academic and theological.

The problem that gave rise to the theology of Peshat and Derash will be the central issue of this book, namely, how can it be that the text that resides at the very core of Judaism, the Pentateuch itself, is susceptible to textual criticism that reveals it to be both internally uneven and apparently inconsistent with observed Jewish law? This is both an academic question of religious and literary history and a pressing theological challenge. On the one hand, we must survey the textual record of Jewish history and appraise the ways in which Judaism has dealt with the difficulties posed by its sacred canon. On the other hand, we shall have to respond to the modern religious Jew who confronts the maculation of the written holy word.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Revelation Restored: Divine Writ and Critical Responses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword: Revelation Restored As Postcritical Theology xi
  • Foreword: A Christian Perspective xix
  • Acknowledgments xxiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- The Compilers' Editorial Policy 11
  • 2- Overcoming Maculation 47
  • 3- Revelation Restored: Theological Consequences 75
  • Afterword: Continuous Revelation 87
  • Notes 91
  • About the Book and Author 101
  • Index 103
  • Index of Textual References 106
  • Index of Names 111
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 114

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.