African Settings in Contemporary American Novels

By Dave Kuhne | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Abish Walter. Alphabetical Africa. New York: New Directions, 1974.

-----. How German Is It. New York: New Directions, 1980.

-----. Eclipse Fever. New York: Knopf, 1993.

Achebe Chinua. Things Fall Apart. 1959. New York: Fawcett, 1969.

-----. Hopes and Impediments: Selected Essays. Garden City, NJ: Doubleday, 1989.

Anderson, David D. "Hemingway and Henderson on the High Savannas: Or, Two Midwestern Moderns and the Myth of Africa." Saul Bellow Journal 8.2 ( 1989): 59-75.

Andrews William. L. "The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography: Theory and Explication." Studies in Black American Literature: Black American Prose Theory. Ed. Joe Weixlmann and Chester J. Fontenot. Greenwood, FL: Penkevill, 1984. 4-42.

Appiah Kwame Anthony. In My Father's House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture. New York: Oxford UP, 1992.

Archer Armstrong. "A Brief View of the Author's Descent from an African King on One Side, and from the Celebrated Indian Chief Powhattan on the Other." Steal Away: Stories of the Runaway Slaves. Ed. Abraham Chapman. New York: Praeger, 1971. 39-45.

Atkinson C. William. "At the Inner Station: Conrad, Greene, and Naipaul on the Congo." Diss. Emory U, 1992.

Azim Firdous. The Colonial Rise of the Novel. London: Routledge, 1993.

Ballantyne. R. M. The Gorilla Hunters. London: Collins, n.d.

Barthold Bonnie J. Black Time: Fiction of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. New Haven: Yale UP, 1981.

Bartholomew John. "Preface". The Times Atlas of the World: Southern Europe and Africa. Boston: Houghton, 1956. xi.

Behn Aphra. Oroonoko: or, The Royal Slave. 1688. New York: Norton, 1973.

Bellow Saul. Henderson the Rain King. New York: Viking, 1959.

Berghahn Marion. Images of Africa in Black American Literature. Totowa, NJ: Rowman, 1977.

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