Buddhist Saints in India: A Study in Buddhist Values and Orientations

By Reginald A. Ray | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abbhokāsika (P.). See Ābhyavakāśika
Abhayagiri (sect), 298, 319n.23
Abhidhamma (P.). See Abhidharma
Abhidhammapiṭaka (P.). See Abhidharmapiṭaka
Abhidharma ("the higher dharma"), 21, 133, 134
Abhidharma (the scholastic enterprise), 379, 424n.9
Abhidharma (as a collection of texts), 35, 406

of the Sarvāstivāda, 406

Abhidharmakośa, 37n. 18
Abhidharmapiṭaka, 184, 201, 337
Abhijñā (superknowledges), 51, 72n.17, 102n.39, 124, 146n.50, 153, 340, 352n. 1. See also Āśravakṣayajñāna; Divyacakṣus; Divyaśrotra; Paracittajñāna; Pūrvanivāsānusmṛti; Ṟddhis

women and men saints possessing same powers, 90

Abhiññā (P.). See Abhijñā
Abhisamācārika (P.) (lesser ethics), 243n.22
Ābhyavakāśika (one who dwells in the open air), 296, 297, 301, 302, 309, 311, 313, 314
Absence of scholarly considerations among the saints (theme 18), 54, 92, 116, 129-30, 181-82, 219, 225-26, 257
Adhigama (attainment), 420
Āgama (as a textual genre), 184, 406
Aikṇṭāsanika. See Ekāsanika
Ajaṇṭā, 428n.33
Ajātaśatru, King, 108-9, 116, 144n.35, 165, 166, 170
Ajita, 179, 205n.2
Ajita Keśakambala, 174n.9
Ajitasenavyākaraṇanirdeśa Sūtra, 206n.3
Ājīvikas, 235
Ājñāta Kauṇḍinya, 118, 194, 146n.55
Alms food, one who lives on. See Piṇḍapātika
Alms-seeking, 24, 27, 83 of forest renunciants, 83
Alpeccha (having few wishes), 309, 311, 314
Amarāvatī, 405, 407
Amitābha, 411, 428nn.31, 33
Amitāyus, 347
Āmrapālī, 55, 73n.30
Amṛta (undying) sphere, 375
Amṛtakāya (undying body), 376
Anāgāmin, 121, 277, 352n.1
Anāgatavaṃsa, 431n.54
Ānanda, 57, 86, 103n.43, 106-7, 108, 109, 118, 121, 142n.18, 143nn.27,28,30, 144n.33, 35, 147n.53,57, 162, 176n.31, 205n.2, 209n.35, 339, 359, 360, 361, 362, 364, 367, 369, 387n.4, 392n.80
sacred places associated with, 188, 189
stūpas of, 190
Anāsravadharmas (undefiled dharmas), 376
Anāthapiṇḍada, 53, 54, 75n.53, 109
Anāthapiṇḍika (P.). See Anāthapiṇḍada
Anavatapta, Lake, 72n.17, 206n.11, 217
Andhaka. See Mahāsāṃghika: Southeastern (Andhaka) schools
Andhra, 405, 407
An + ̄guttaranikāya, 105, 137, 157, 159, 162, 163, 297, 370, 371
An + ̄guttaranikāya commentary. See Manorathapūṇraī

-469-

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Buddhist Saints in India: A Study in Buddhist Values and Orientations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Conventions xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - The Buddhist Saints and the Two-Tiered Model of Buddhism 15
  • Notes 36
  • 2 - Buddha Śākyamuni as a Saint 44
  • Notes 68
  • 3 - Saints of the Theragāthā and Therīgāthā 79
  • Notes 99
  • 4 - Some Orthodox Saints in Buddhism 105
  • Conclusion 136
  • Notes 141
  • 5 - Saints Criticized and Condemned 151
  • Notes 173
  • 6 - Cults of Arhants 179
  • Notes 205
  • 7 - The Solitary Saint, the Pratyekabuddha 213
  • Notes 241
  • 8 - Bodhisattva Saints of the Forest in Mahāyāna Sūtras 251
  • Appendix: the Minor Rāṣṭrapālaparipṛcchā Sūtra on Forest Bhikṣus 275
  • Appendix: the Minor Rāṣṭrapālaparipṛcchā Sūtra on Forest Bhikṣus 280
  • 9 - Ascetic Traditions of Buddhist Saints 293
  • Notes 318
  • 10 - The Buddhist Saints and the Stūpa 324
  • Notes 352
  • 11 - The Cult of Saints and Buddhist Doctrines of Absence and Presence 358
  • Notes 386
  • 12 - The Buddhist Saints and the Process of Monasticization 396
  • Notes 423
  • Conclusion: Toward a Threefold Model of Buddhism 433
  • Notes 447
  • Bibliography 448
  • Index 469
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