Banjo Eyes: Eddie Cantor and the Birth of Modern Stardom

By Herbert G. Goldman | Go to book overview
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NOTES

Chapter One

Sources for this chapter include United States and New York census records for 1910, extensive interviews with Janet Cantor Gari, Cantor two autobiographies ( My Life Is in Your Hands and Take My Life), an brief interview with Theodore Levy, Esq., a notice Cantor placed in the New York Times ( 1947) mentioning the names of four of his grade school teachers (other than Catherine Luddy), The History of Surprise Lake Camp, and theatrical trade papers (re: Billy the Kid).


Chapter Two

Take My Life, the 1910 census, the Earl Wilson interview with J. C. Weir, and theatrical trade weeklies were the principal sources for this chapter. Jessel book So Help Me was also helpful.


Chapter Three

So Help Me provided some of the information on Gus Edwards. The trades helped trace both the act's route and what acts appeared on the same bills. Cantor and Jessel both remembered meeting Jolson when Kid Kabaret played Oakland/ San Francisco. The Cantor-Tobias wedding certificate gave a few details, and The Era, a British theatrical trade weekly, provided information on Cantor and Lee at the Oxford. The material on Canary Cottage is from the show's program, Cantor's reminiscences, and contemporary reviews. Miles Kreuger's interview with Anna Held's daughter, numerous writings on Flo Ziegfeld, and a visit to Esther Kantrowitz's grave yielded the remaining information.

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